Zenawi’s Myth of Economic Transformation & Double Digit Growth in Ethiopia

August 24th, 2010 Print Print Email Email

On its August 9, 2010 issue, the Financial Times, a prestigious international newspaper, run an article authored by Mr. William Willis, the newspaper’s Africa Editor. (more…)

On its August 9, 2010 issue, the Financial Times, a prestigious international newspaper, run an article authored by Mr. William Willis, the newspaper’s Africa Editor. In his article entitled “Perfidious Donors Betray African Democrats”, Mr. Willis wrote “…in Ethiopia, the same is almost true but with a disturbing caveat. It is an open secret that the double-digit growth of recent years is supported by dubious statistics. Yet the same figures are bandied around by development experts arguing that a trade-off between growth and civil liberties is inevitable…”. Another study, which was released by Oxford University and the UN on multi-poverty index (MPI) around the same time, has ranked Ethiopia as the second poorest among the poorest 10 countries in Africa, only preceding Niger as the poorest of the poor.

What then are the basis to claims about a “double digit growth” in Ethiopia and all the pop and fanfare surrounding the so-called “economic transformation” and “Development” of Ethiopia under Meles Zenawi’s regime?

Such persistent and glaring contradictions between the regime’s claims of economic growth and development on one hand and study of other international organizations on the other have prompted a Council of Ethiopian economists and experts to look into the matter even deeper. It is expected that they will make their finding public with regard to Meles Zenawi’ claims to an unparalleled “Double digit economic growth”.

The Voice of America (VOA) has a two part interview with Dr. Getachew Begashaw, professor of economics and head of the economics department at William Ray Harper College in Chicago, IL and Dr. Aklog Birara, a person who has served at the World Bank as a senior advisor for over thirty years.

VOA

German Radio has a similar discussion with Professors Seid Hassan and Minga Negash. Click below to listen:

DW

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