Why I write? – By Teodros Kiros (PH.D)

February 14th, 2008 Print Print Email Email

I must begin by thanking all the engaged readers who have been studiously following my modest attempts at contributing to the debates on Seeye Abraha, whom I have called “the voice of reasoned dialogue.”

Some of my readers have called me names, ranging from “the poorest of the poor,” “the super paid handler of Seeye’s group,” “the hidden agent of Woyane,” and most recently “an Ethnic lord, who is promoting Seeye because he is a Tigre like him” and many, many, other names. (more…)

I must begin by thanking all the engaged readers who have been studiously following my modest attempts at contributing to the debates on Seeye Abraha, whom I have called “the voice of reasoned dialogue.”

Some of my readers have called me names, ranging from “the poorest of the poor,” “the super paid handler of Seeye’s group,” “the hidden agent of Woyane,” and most recently “an Ethnic lord, who is promoting Seeye because he is a Tigre like him” and many, many, other names.

I consider myself quite lucky to be attended to with such passion. I like the passion of my readers- passion is a revolutionary virtue, because it motivates thought. What I do not like is venom, because venom kills.

Be that as it may, I know must answer my own question, “Why I write?”

I write because writing is my vocation. I enjoy it.

But joy is not the only reason. I write because I consider myself a responsible citizen of the Ethiopia that I love from the depth of my veins. I do not write to please the public; if I did, my life would be so different. To the extent that I can, I try to write truthfully at all times, although, that habit will not make me “the person of the year” or even lead me to the right job.

I enjoy writing from the margins, where there is so much pain, so much abuse, and yet, as long as my words flow from the depth of my heart, and are monitored by the Transcendent, and the writing is right and beautiful, I will have obtained a sense of fulfillment which money cannot buy. My recent writings on Seeye are motivated by a single idea, and that is, at this particular moment in time, Seeye, the reconciler, the insider, who has decided to tell it all by risking his life, and correct the mistakes that the party that he and the other members of Woyane made, will save Ethiopia from the path of destruction. Seeye is a symbol of change, of a new beginning, of a new rendezvous with Ethiopian history.

I do not just support Seeye the man, I support only the idea of hope, of peace, of democratic engagement that Seeye is calling for with a contagious charisma and depth of moral thought,, and I do so as an Ethiopian, born to a Tigrean family.

My foremost commitment is to Ethiopiawinet with dignity, to Ethiopiawinet, freed from the venom of destructive ethnicity and freshly framed by the idea of Andenet (Unity).

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