UN’s 2006 Human Development Rankings (HDR) placed Ethiopia at the eighth least position out of the 177 countries the report treated.

November 13th, 2006 Print Print Email Email

Daily Monitor | November 13,2006

The UN’s 2006 Human Development Rankings (HDR) placed Ethiopia at the eighth least position out of the 177 countries the report treated.

Ethiopia stood at 170th place in the latest report released on Thursday, where Norway tops and Niger bottoms the list, as was exactly the case in the earlier 2005 human development rankings.
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The highest performing Norway scored a 0.965 point, while Ethiopia’s and Niger’s ranking points stood at 0.371 and 0.311 respectively in the 2006 report.

Securing the 63rd position, Mauritius tops African nations the latest list included, followed by Libya at the 64th place.

The human development index is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries world wide.

According to the UNDP, the index is a standard measure of well-being, while it is used to distinguish whether the nation the survey treated is a developed, developing, or under developed country, as well as to measure the impact of economic policies on quality of life.

The latest report indicated the gap between the richest and poorest countries in the world is growing, as human development in sub-Saharan Africa stagnates, and progress in other regions accelerates.

The HDI statistics revealed life expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa dropped to an average of 46 years, or 32 years less than the average life expectancy in countries of advanced human development, with 20 years slashed of life expectancy due to HIV/AIDS.

Comparing the wealth and life expectancy of the two nations at the extreme ends of the ranking list, the report noted people in Norway are 40 times wealthier than those in Niger, and they live almost twice as long.

The simple truth that people are the real wealth of nations is sometimes forgotten, one of the authors of the latest report has stressed. “Mesmerized by the rise and fall of national incomes as measured by GDP, we tend to equate human welfare with material wealth. But the ultimate yardstick for measuring progress is peoples quality of life.”

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